#SquadGoals — Who’s on Your Cultural IQ Team?

We’ve all heard that “it takes a village.” When it comes to providing the best care, it often takes a team – each with specific (and sometimes overlapping) roles. From interpreters and transliterators to translators and other clinicians, partnering with the right language and cultural experts can set you up for success. 

Clinician
 
Interpreter
 
Translator
 
Transliterator
 
Cultural Broker
 
Linguistic Broker
 
The Foundation
 

Clinician (Audiologists, Speech-Language Pathologists)


Role
Assessment
Diagnosis
Session planning/creating an environment for successful collaboration
Selection of culturally relevant materials
Offering accommodations
Administering services

Interpreter


Role
Conveying spoken or signed communications from one language to another
May serve in the role of a cultural or linguistic broker
Collaboration Benefits
Provides both meaning and context in two-way communication

Translator


Role
Translating written text from one language to another
May serve in the role of a cultural or linguistic broker
Collaboration Benefits
Provides literal translation

Transliterator


Role
Facilitating communication for individuals from one form to another form of the same language
May serve in the role of a cultural or linguistic broker
Collaboration Benefits
Extremely beneficial for communicating with individuals who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing (D/HOH) who use oral, cued, or manual communication systems rather than a formal sign language

Cultural Broker


Role
Offers deep knowledge about the client's/patient's culture and/or speech-language community
Collaboration Benefits
Is able to pass cultural/community-related information between the client and the clinician in order to optimize services
Can offer grammaticality judgments, information on the language socialization patterns, and information on other areas of language, including semantics and pragmatics

Linguistic Broker


Role
Offers specific knowledge about the client's/patient's speech community or communication environment
Collaboration Benefits
Can provide valuable information about language and sociolinguistic norms in the client's/patient's speech community and communication environment
Can offer grammaticality judgments, information on the language socialization patterns, and information on other areas of language, including semantics and pragmatics

The Foundation Client, Family and Caregivers


Each listed role comes back to serving and supporting the recipients of the services — the foundation on which care is built.

Have more questions about collaboration?

Learn More

Please note that funding for interpreters, transliterators, or translators may come from a variety of sources. Generally, clients/patients are not expected to pay out of pocket for these services to ensure access to care.

*NOTE: Legal and ethical standards (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association [ASHA], 2017; Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Executive Order No. 13,166 [2000]; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990, as amended) require that services to individuals who use a language other than spoken English must be delivered in the language most appropriate to that student, client, patient, or family.

Sources

https://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Professional-Issues/Collaborating-With-Interpreters/

https://www.asha.org/PRPSpecificTopic.aspx?folderid=8589935334&section=Key_Issues